Shuttle Discovery Build Complete

Well I missed my self-imposed deadline, but not by too much.  I finished it before Christmas.  The SSME and OAMS engine bells went on well and the orbiter was given a coat of Future Floor Finish to protect the massive amount of decals on the orbiter.  After giving that a day to set up, Discovery was given a coat of dull coat.  It looks pretty good.  If I build another, I’ll be sure to paint the cockpit walls black.  It is a bit distracting that there is nothing behind the windows.  Otherwise though I think it looks pretty good.  Here are some photos of the finished orbiter.

The SRB’s were next.  They had been sitting there, painted white patiently waiting for me to do something with them.  The top section of each SRB is painted a light cream/tan color.  Mixing that one took some time to get something I could live with.  With the orbiter finished it was time to start adding the decals to the SRB’s.  I had to reprint the “LOADED” markings a few times before I got them the correct size.  Those suckers were TINY!  I also painted the foam on the stiffening rings on the lower SRB segments.  Next time the black rings on the SRB’s will be a bit wider, these seem too narrow.  After the decals, the SRB’s got a coat of Future Floor Finish to protect the decals from the dull coat that was to follow.  Below is a pic of the remaining sections of the shuttle stack.  The ET has the yellow sections painted and waiting to be masked off before painting the darker shades of foam.  Masking the aft shuttle attachment was a pain in the butt.  The SRB’s are still missing their nozzles.  Those will go on after the dull coat.  You can see the brass tube sticking out the bottom of the SRB.  This will accept a wire rod that will support the stack on the stand.  Both SRB’s have the brass tubes in them.  To be sure they are centered and vertical, the rod runs the entire length of the SRB from the tip of the nose cone to nozzle.  They are epoxied into the nose of each SRB.

I didn’t get pictures of the painting process for the ET, unfortunately.  But here are some pictures of the finished stack.  It turned out pretty well.  I’m happy with the ET colors.  If I had to do it again, I’d probably change the shade of the intertank area a bit, but I’m still happy.  The stand could have been a bit better.  I’m not pleased with the grain showing through.  But at a distance it looks good.  The stiff wires running up the SRB’s are doing a great job of holding the stack vertical without my having to add a support for the orbiter.  Here is the finished gallery of photos.

Now I’m ready for the new year and a new project.  Next up, a 1/144 Saturn V for the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.

Advertisements

Shuttle Discovery Build Update

Since January I’ve made some small progress on the STS-31 build.  I got the OMS and Main Engines added to the orbiter and sprayed on the dull coat.  It looks much better now, kind of like a shuttle orbiter.

I drilled small holes in the backs of the main engines and OMS engines.  I then CA’ed a short styrene rod into each engine nozzle.  I drilled corresponding holes in the back of the orbiter and then CA’ed the nozzles into place.  That completed the assembly of the orbiter.

I then sprayed the whole orbiter with Tamiya Dull Coat.  I did it in light coats so that there was less chance of it attacking the decals.  Even though the model was clear coated with Future, I did not want to risk messing up the decals, since about 80 percent of the orbiter is covered with them.

The SRB’s are coming along.  I have the right SRB with all it’s decals on, and I’m preparing to put the decals on the left SRB.  The ET is still sitting in the condition it was in last January.  I guess I’ll have to suck it up and start masking it and get it painted.  It’s been sitting there long enough mocking me.

I want to get it finished before Thanksgiving so I can start on my next build.  I’ll be starting a 1/144 scale Saturn V.  My goal is to get it completed before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, in July 2019.

Anyway, hopefully in the next few weeks I can post an update showing the completed STS-31 stack.

Space Shuttle Discovery Build

I’ve been working on a 1/144 shuttle stack of Discovery (STS-31) on and off (mostly off) for the last year or so.  I’ve finally made some progress on it.  The SRB’s are close, I need to relocate a couple of antennas and then do some hand painting and the decals.  The ET is the part that has probably caused this build to sit idle for so long.  Getting the colors right and masking is just giving me fits.  Eventually I’ll have to tackle it.  The orbiter is almost finished.  I painted it a few months ago and recently decided that I need to get the decals on it and at least get this part finished.

The decals are a combination of the RealSpace Models decal set, the Warbird Decals sets 14404 and 14405 and some decals that I made myself.  The Warbird decals for the topside of the orbiter are pretty good.  I used the decals for the nose, the forward RCS, star trackers, bay door hinges, access panels, tail and elevons.  I also used the Warbird decals for the wing topside, and the bottom side tiles.  I used the RealSpace decals for some of the SRB markings and the orbiter main hatch.  I made my own decals for the RCS covers on the sides of the orbiter nose.  I used the RealSpace decals for the cockpit windows as a starting point since they are the right shape.  I greatly toned down the tile edges since the tile marks are hardly visible at this scale.  The upper windows are correct but for the Discovery on the STS-31 mission, there are warning triangles next to both windows.  So I made my own for those.  Also the shuttles have two vents surrounded by black on the left side of the vehicle and on the right side of the vehicle is a single vent surrounded by black.  The RealSpace set has the single vent for the right side, but it has yellow warning signs on it which were not there on STS-31, so I made my own.  The Warbird decals for markings between the tail and OAMS pods are correct except they include yellow boxes that are not there on a ready for flight vehicle.  Also they include decals for the black tiles on the OAMS pod fronts.  But they also show individual tiles which I didn’t want.  So again, I made my own in both cases based on the Warbird decals.

Anyway I finally got the decals on and they look pretty good.  The Warbird decals seem fairly thick, which is a good thing since some of the decals are very large.  Even though they are thick, they react well to Microscale Micro Set and Micro Sol.  Between the two of them the decals laid down nicely and really do have the painted on look.

Here are some pictures of the orbiter so far.  I say “so far” because I have not yet sprayed on the dullcoat layer and the main engines and OAMS nozzles are not on yet.  It has been covered with a coat of Pledge Floor Care (used to be Future Floor Finish a long time ago) hence the very glossy shine.  I needed to seal in the decals to protect them from the Tamiya Clear Flat since it specifically states on the can that it can damage decals.  I’ll be doing a test shot first to be sure the Pledge will not react with the Tamiya Clear Flat.  The photo of the left side is out of focus, I’ll try and update it later.

Once that is done maybe I can get to the SRB’s get them finished and then work up the courage to tackle the ET.

Cord Cutting Update #4

Well we did it.  I contacted AT&T and we cancelled U-verse TV.  The only thing left with them is our internet.  When I called they of course tried to come up with various packages to try and keep me with them.  All of them would cost more than just cutting the cord and going with what we have set up for streaming.  In the process they did bump our internet access from 18mb to 24mb for the same cost we are paying now.

We were thinking of moving to Toast.net for internet service, but now I need to do some evaluation to be sure.  The upside of Toast.net is that there is no data cap.  AT&T has a 1000gb cap.  From studying our usage so far it looks like we would able to fairly easily stay under the cap.  They both charge $60 for 24mb download speed.  But I think we might be able to use 18mb download without any buffering issues.  During our testing period we did not notice any buffering.  If we do decide that 18mb will work, Toast.net offers 18mb for $50 a month with no cap.  We will have to think about that some more.  It might be worth going to Toast.net just to avoid the data cap.

So how much do we think we will actually be able to save by cord cutting?  Here is the breakdown we are looking at:

Here is how our AT&T bill breaks down: Continue reading “Cord Cutting Update #4”

Cutting the Cord Update #3

OK, so far I’ve got an antenna installed in the attic.  I have that attached to a Tablo OTA DVR which is then connected to our home network.  I have the Vonage phone service installed.  The last main piece for cutting the cord is to get a set top box and decide which live TV streaming service to use.

Roku just updated their line of set top boxes for 2017 and the Roku Ultra price has dropped to $99.  I ordered one from Amazon and got it a couple of days later.  I opted to get the Ultra since it (and the Streaming Stick+) supports 4K TV and its remote can power the TV on and off and also control the sound.  Unlike the Streaming Stick+, the Ultra also has an Ethernet port, a micro SD slot, a headphone jack for private listening, and a remote finder feature.  For many people the Streaming Stick+ will be good option and costs about $30 less.

I hooked it up to the Samsung in the bedroom and the set up was very easy.  I had to create a Roku account on their website during the setup but that was no problem.  Part of the set up was to get the remote set up with the TV so it could operate the sound and turn the TV on and off.  That went easy as well.

I installed the Tablo app on the Roku and connected to the Tablo that is upstairs.  I went to the guide and picked a channel and started watching TV from the antenna.  Very nice indeed.

Now, what live TV streaming service should I pick?  Sling TV, DirecTV Now, Playstation Vue, Hulu with Live TV, or Fubo? Continue reading “Cutting the Cord Update #3”

Cutting the Cord Update #2

We have moved our landline phone service to Vonage.  It went very smooth, after one bonehead mistake by me.  I went online and ordered the Vonage service on a Sunday.  I went with the 1 yr package since that included free hardware and activation.  In most cases you can keep your existing number.  Since we chose to do that, after ordering the service, I was directed to an online form where I entered our current provider and a few other bits of information.  This allowed them to handle the number switch for me.  It generally takes a week for the switch to take place.  I was just hoping that the hardware would get here before the number switch took place.  I was notified by email that the switch would be taking place on Friday.  That gave them four days to get the hardware to me.

I actually had nothing to worry about since the little Vonage box arrived on Wednesday.  Now I just had to wait for AT&T to do the switch.  On Friday morning I got up and checked the phone and sure enough there was no dial tone.  Also the Phone 1 indicator light on my AT&T router was no longer lit.  It was time to install the hardware and see if it all worked.

I followed the instructions included with the Vonage box, and then unplugged the phone line out cable from the AT&T box and plugged it into the Vonage box.  The lights on the Vonage box started to blink, but they were not blinking the way they should be.  I also noticed that the broadband indicator light on my AT&T modem was not lit anymore either.  What the heck did I do?  It didn’t take long to realize that I had plugged the broadband cable into the Vonage box instead of the phone line.  I put the broadband line back into the router and waited for everything to hook back up.  I then moved the REAL phone line from the router to the Vonage box.  I took mere seconds for the Vonage box to sync up and show the proper status lights.  I picked up the phone and had a dial tone again. Yea!!!

Not so fast, I could make calls just fine, but if I called my landline number all I got was a message that the number was disconnected.  Crap!  Was I going to have to call Vonage and find out what was going on?  I didn’t have time right then to do anything, I had to get over to my mother’s house to help her with some things.  I figured if it was still disconnected by the time I got back then I’d call Vonage.  Well by the time I got back home everything was working fine.

One more thing to check off the list.  Now on to the set top boxes (Roku).

Yet Another Way to Fail When Flying Rockets

Jolly Logic Chute Release

Early in 2016 I bought a Jolly Logic Chute Release.  The device is about the size of a small matchbox.  It allows you to turn any rocket (that the device will fit into) into what is essentially a dual-deploy rocket.  I have several 2.5  to 7 inch diameter rockets that deploy their parachutes at apogee (the highest point of the rocket’s flight).  Depending on the altitude the rocket reaches and the wind it can result in a long walk to retrieve the rocket.

Enter the Jolly Logic Chute Release.  This nifty little device uses a rubber band and pin that wraps around the folded parachute preventing it from opening.  Then when the rocket descends to a pre-selected altitude the pin will release and the parachute will unfurl and the rocket will land safely at a distance that is much closer that it would have otherwise.  I used it quite a bit during the 2016 flying season and had only one failure when the rubber band released from the Chute Release, but somehow entangled in the parachute which caused the parachute to fail to open.  I have avoided stretching the rubber band that tight since then and have had no problems.

That is until this last flight in November 2017.  I had missed all the 2017 season due to back problems, but I finally seem to have that managed and I went out fly on the last launch on the year.  I carefully folded the parachute for my LOC Precision Minnie Magg and wrapped the Chute Release rubber band and pin around the parachute and locked in into the other side of the Chute Release.  I then did my usual shake test to be sure the parachute would not slide out from the rubber band and everything was fine.  Out to the pad I went and we launched it on an Aerotech I161 motor.  It boosted beautifully into the clear November sky, arced over popped the nosecone and bundled parachute out at apogee.  It fell down to abour 400 feet when the Chute Release did its job and released the parachute which opened perfectly and it landed a few hundred feet from the pad.  What a great way to end the season.  A perfect flight.

At least it was until Continue reading “Yet Another Way to Fail When Flying Rockets”