50th Anniversary Saturn V Build Update 3

Since the last update I’ve added all the PE to the aft skirt. Now I need to add in the missing stringers on the fairings and fill the slot for the systems tunnel. I will be using the systems tunnel from the Monogram kit since it is longer and comes closest the proper length, therefore I need to fill the slot.

Below is a shot of one side with the PE and air scoops. You can also see the brass rod extending through the top of the skirt. I used some JB Weld to help hold it in place. The resin fins are from the New-Ware set and are just friction fitted to see how they look. I’ll wait to actually install them until it is painted.

One of the pictures is rotated 90 degrees to show one of the sides where the stringer had to be rescribed after removing the large hump.

There is also a view of the bottom with the brass heat shield in place. You can see the small amount of brass tube protruding that will be used to locate the center engine.

I’ve added the missing stringers to the the engine fairings. Below is a shot of the work in progress. They are .3mm styrene rod glued on with Plasti-zap CA. It doesn’t set quite as fast as thin CA, so I’ve got a few seconds to get them lined up properly. I used long strips to give me plenty of area to get my fat fingers in there to place them properly. After the CA sets then I can just snip them off with my X-acto. In the picture you can barely (on the right quadrant) see the that the depression for the systems tunnel is filled. I used some styrene sheet and then filler putty.

I’m using the Airfix interstage. The Monogram interstage has a taper that is too big for me to ignore. The Airfix part is more straight. I’ve also removed the four ulage motors and the extensions of the second stage detail that appear on the interstage. I’ve got some filling and rescribing to do on this part.  Plus a PE part needs to be added.

Below are also a couple of shots of the S-IC. It is mostly done. Just need to do some filling where the systems tunnel from the main body meets the aft skirt. I’ve added all the PE to the S-IC. Both the aft skirt and the main body are from the Airfix kit.

I’ve also started on the S-II stage. I’ll be using the Monogram part for this. Since I have to remove all the molded on details anyway, I thought I’d use the Monogram part since it does not have that huge hump at the seam line in the stringer sections. At this point I’ve removed all the molded on details. I will have to remove some of the molded on stringers on the forward and aft stringer sections. They are too long. Time to make some measurements.

I’ve also removed the resin parts from their pour plugs. I’m amazed that I didn’t break any of them while removing the plugs.

Pretty good progress so far.  Maybe I’ll make the July 20th deadline.

50th Anniversary Saturn V Build Update 2

More progress has been made on the Saturn V build.  I have removed all the raised detail from the aft skirt heat shield.  That all had to go in order to install the brass part from New-Ware.  The brass part is very nice and has much better detail that what was on the original piece.  After removing the raised detail I got to thinking about how I was going to mount the model on its wooden base.  I have used steel rod in the past and that works well.  All I have to do is figure out how to accommodate the rod in the base of the model.  I am using 1/8 in brass tubing and that will slide over the steel rod that is in the base.  I used some paper tubes and epoxy to cover the hole where the center engine will be mounted.  After epoxying the tubes in place and filling them with epoxy, I drilled an 1/8 in hole from the center engine through the tube and out the top of the aft skirt part.  I then used JB Weld and put the 1/8 in brass in the drilled hole and about 3/16 in out the bottom.  The extra out the bottom will aid in mounting the center engine.

After doing that I decided that having a 1/8 tube projecting from the heat shield would be a great way to mount all the engines.  You can see the 1/8 in plastic tubes that I epoxied in place for each engine.

The pictures show the rescribed ribbing where I sanded the hump down.  You can also see that I have started adding some of the photo etched (PE) details to the aft skirt.

50th Anniversary Saturn V Build Update 1

My New-Ware detail set came in, so I’m getting back to the Saturn V build.  The resin detail parts are very nice.  I’ll be using the batted F-1 engines that came with the New-Ware set.  As far as the aft skirt goes, I’ll be using the resin air scoops that are on the engine fairings.  I looked at using them as is and removing my sheet styrene additions, but I don’t like the way that they are modeled as recessed parts.  They were not recessed on vehicle, they were actually on the outside of the skirts. (Update: They actually were recessed, but they also had a raised section of scoop that is not on the New-Ware parts.)  So I cut the scoops out of the part and discarded the rest.  I will be using my styrene add-ons after all.  I will then attach the air scoops to my styrene additions.

The pictures show most of the resin parts and how nicely they are molded.  There is a fret of etched brass that has many more details on it.  I’ll post a picture of those soon.

The Airfix aft skirt has a very noticeable bump on the mold lines.  I really want to get rid of those, so I have sanded that section of the aft skirt flat, and I’ll try scribing new ribbing in those areas.  I really don’t want to sand off all the ribbing and try to replace it with styrene strips or scribing new ones all the way around the skirt.  We shall see how it goes.

Voskhod Update 1

Time for a quick update on the Voskhod build.  I started on the first stage.  I drilled a 1/8 in hole in the first stage base part.  Then I cut a piece of brass tube to length and glued on a cardboard centering ring to one end.  The other end will go through the hole in the first stage base part.  I then glued that assembly into one half of the first stage using epoxy.  When that setup, I then glued the second half on using my Tenax substitue.  I also put a dab of epoxy on the cardboard centering ring to attach it to other half of the first stage.  When everything was set I tested it on my Vostok model base and it works fine.

I then started filling and sanding on the first stage and the strap on boosters.  The first stage also has the booster truss completed.  I was able to use the Airfix parts and I think they will look good.

If you look at the pictures below you will see the strap-on boosters lined up behind the first stage that is being worked on.  They actually are lined up in a specific order.  I found out that the strap-on boosters fit better at certain positions on the truss.  I test fitted all of them and noted which position worked best.  Then I made a small mark on the back side of each strap-on.  The mark will never be seen since it is on the back side next to the first stage.  I also had to trim a bit of the first stage where the top of the strap-on meets the first stage.  There is a bump at that point where the tip of the strap-on is to be mated to the first stage.  All of the strap-ons were too high by just under a 16th of an inch.  I trimmed each mating point according to where each strap-on would be placed.  Everything now seems to fit.

I also added the interstage truss brass to the top of the first stage.  The photos I can find of Voskhod 2 are very inconclusive as to what that area is supposed to look like.  I took a path that I think will make the model work and look like some of the photos.  The brass interstage truss comes as a “Y” shape.  The tail of the “Y” is supposed to run from the first stage body to the end of the stage at the blast plate.  Then the top of the “Y” is the truss work that actually separates the stages.  I think you can see in the photos what I mean.  I used JB Weld epoxy to join the ends of the truss and CA to attach it to the first stage.  My research photos also show that if the tails of the “Y”s are used then there is a small raised line around the bottom of the “Y”s.  I added that with some 0.5mm styrene strip stock.

Next step is to primer all the parts.

How to Stop Government Shutdowns

I don’t usually post about politics since it can be a divisive topic, but the recent shutdown fiasco has prompted me to say something.

Holding government employees hostage over political maters is stupid and just plain wrong.  The opposing sides need to sit down and come to a compromise (that seems to be a bad word these days).  Congress could and should put an end to the possibility of government shutdowns.  They would need to pass a new bill that stipulates in the event that an appropriations bill cannot be passed before the end of the fiscal year the current level of funding will continue until such time that a new appropriation bill is passed.

This would eliminate the possibility of a shutdown because all agencies would receive continued funding even if a new bill has not been approved.  Government employees would no longer have to fear loss of income just because the politicians can’t come to an agreement.  I would hope that our president would sign such a bill to provide stability for the 800,000 government workers that get held hostage every time a new round of appropriation bills comes up.

Now Congress and President, go do your jobs.

Enough said!